Using JQuery and AJAX to Display API Data on a Web Page

My last post demonstrated how JavaScript and JQuery can be used to make a API call and embed the response into a Document Object Model (DOM) instance. In that post’s example, the API was called, the data was retrieved and loaded into the DOM, but nothing was displayed on the web page. In this post, I show how to access the API response data and present it on the web page. This is the next step in illustrating how the API Science API can be utilized to develop custom consoles and other applications that address your particular needs.

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Introduction: Javascript and Custom API Dashboards

Javascript provides the capability for a company whose product is based on APIs to create custom dashboards that show their team the current status of the APIs that are critical for their product. If certain APIs are down, then their product is either down or partially down from the point of view of their customers. […]

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Templates: Reusable Building Blocks for Complex API Monitoring

The API Science API includes a templates API. A template is the code that represents “a single URL request.” In a sense, then, a template is the equivalent of a software subroutine or function. It is called to perform an action that produces a specified output based on a specific set of input parameters. The […]

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Monitoring Your API’s Uptime Using the API Science API

My previous post talked about what you can do when a massive cyber attack brings down APIs (your own, or external APIs) that are critical for your product. The API Science API includes a Monitor Reports component that lets your product’s operational software integrate your API monitoring into the ongoing creation of your product. The […]

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Integrating API Monitoring into Your Product’s Operational Workflow

You’ve got a product that requires many nines of uptime. If an API (external or internal) that your product requires is down, your own product is down, or key aspects of it are down. You are monitoring the APIs that are key for your product, and have alerts configured so that your development and QA […]

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Modifying Groups of API Monitors Using Tags

In recent posts, I’ve described how you can use API Science’s API to evaluate API monitor checks, detect failed checks, and use tags to group API monitors. If you’ve integrated the monitoring of your product’s performance and availability using the API Science API, it’s also possible to take the next step of modifying your monitors […]

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Using Tags to Group API Monitors

Many online products require gathering information from many different data sources. If your product queries multiple APIs (external or internal), then it is vital for your team to monitor those APIs in order to assess whether your product appears up, partially up, or down. My last two posts described how you can use the API […]

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Evaluating API Monitor Checks Using the API Science API

Your API monitoring team can be alerted when an API that’s critical for your product goes down using API Science’s alerts capability, which provides the ability to notify your team about problems using email, a URL, Slack, PagerDuty, and HipChat. These methods can be extended using tools like IFTTT (IF This Then That) such that […]

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Using Slack, Zapier, HipChat, PagerDuty, IFTTT, and Todoist to Broadcast API Monitor Alerts

Today, many companies have employees that work from diverse locations around the globe. If your company’s product relies on APIs (internal and/or external), your team needs to know immediately when a critical API goes down or starts delivering invalid information. But how can you quickly communicate problems of this type to your global team? The […]

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