Monitoring Your API’s Uptime Using the API Science API

My previous post talked about what you can do when a massive cyber attack brings down APIs (your own, or external APIs) that are critical for your product.

The API Science API includes a Monitor Reports component that lets your product’s operational software integrate your API monitoring into the ongoing creation of your product. The product you present to your customers changes depending on the status of the APIs that provide the data your product provides to your customers. You need to monitor all APIs that are critical for your product if you are to know when customers might be seeing outages.

One way to do this is to send alerts to your team whenever a critical API goes down. If the outage is not that significant, your team can address the issue and ensure that your customers know you are coping with the outage.

But, in a situation where there is a massive geographical outage, sending an endless succession of alerts to your team may be inadequate…

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What to Do when a Massive Cyber Attack Brings Down APIs

In mid-May, a massive global cyber attack was executed that affected major companies in more than 150 countries. Major victims of the attack included Britain’s National Health Service, “causing widespread disruptions and interrupting medical procedures across hospitals in England and Scotland.” Other major victims included Spain’s Telefonica, Deutsche Bahn (Germany’s national railway service), French carmaker […]

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Integrating API Monitoring into Your Product’s Operational Workflow

You’ve got a product that requires many nines of uptime. If an API (external or internal) that your product requires is down, your own product is down, or key aspects of it are down. You are monitoring the APIs that are key for your product, and have alerts configured so that your development and QA […]

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Modifying Groups of API Monitors Using Tags

In recent posts, I’ve described how you can use API Science’s API to evaluate API monitor checks, detect failed checks, and use tags to group API monitors. If you’ve integrated the monitoring of your product’s performance and availability using the API Science API, it’s also possible to take the next step of modifying your monitors […]

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Why You Should Never Shut Down Your API Servers (unless you absolutely have to)

The ongoing global Ransomeware cyber attack has “hit 200,000 victims in at least 150 countries” according to Europe’s cross-border police agency, Europol: Europol Director Rob Wainwright said the global reach of the attack was “unprecedented” and “pretty indiscriminate,” affecting everything from hospitals and schools to auto giants. “We’ve never seen anything like this,” he told […]

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Using Tags to Group API Monitors

Many online products require gathering information from many different data sources. If your product queries multiple APIs (external or internal), then it is vital for your team to monitor those APIs in order to assess whether your product appears up, partially up, or down. My last two posts described how you can use the API […]

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Detecting Failed API Monitor Checks Using the API Science API

In my last post, I illustrated how we can use the API Science Checks API endpoint to gather the results of recent checks for an API monitor. In that post, the example check was a successful call for my “br Ireland” monitor, which queries the World Bank Countries API for information about Brazil from a server located in Ireland. My “br_Ireland” monitor has a validation setting that requires an HTTP Response code of “200” in order for the API check to be considered successful…

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Evaluating API Monitor Checks Using the API Science API

Your API monitoring team can be alerted when an API that’s critical for your product goes down using API Science’s alerts capability, which provides the ability to notify your team about problems using email, a URL, Slack, PagerDuty, and HipChat. These methods can be extended using tools like IFTTT (IF This Then That) such that […]

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How to Use the Results From One API Call in Another API Call

In many cases, the availability of your product depends on a sequence of API calls (to both external and internal APIs). Information retrieved from one API may be a critical input for your subsequent call to a different API. If the first call fails, the second can’t return a valid result. So, a question is: […]

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Introduction to API Monitor Local Variables

Recent posts have talked about the capability the API Science API monitoring platform provides for creating and working with global variables that are maintained across multiple monitors. In this post, we’ll look into the platform’s capability for creating local variables that are specific to an individual API monitor. The fact is, APIs change over time. […]

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