Templates: Reusable Building Blocks for Complex API Monitoring

The API Science API includes a templates API. A template is the code that represents “a single URL request.” In a sense, then, a template is the equivalent of a software subroutine or function. It is called to perform an action that produces a specified output based on a specific set of input parameters. The template is a subroutine that embeds a call to another “subroutine” that is located on a remote server: our template’s HTTP call to that API sends the input data, and the template gathers the returned result, typically in the form of a JSON or XML response…

Continue reading

Monitoring Your API’s Performance Using the API Science API

If your product depends on your own internal API, or if your primary customers are users who use your API, then you need to know when your API’s performance is experiencing problems. In my last post I described how you can use the API Science Uptime Report to address an unexpected massive outage related to […]

Continue reading

Monitoring Your API’s Uptime Using the API Science API

My previous post talked about what you can do when a massive cyber attack brings down APIs (your own, or external APIs) that are critical for your product. The API Science API includes a Monitor Reports component that lets your product’s operational software integrate your API monitoring into the ongoing creation of your product. The […]

Continue reading

What to Do when a Massive Cyber Attack Brings Down APIs

In mid-May, a massive global cyber attack was executed that affected major companies in more than 150 countries. Major victims of the attack included Britain’s National Health Service, “causing widespread disruptions and interrupting medical procedures across hospitals in England and Scotland.” Other major victims included Spain’s Telefonica, Deutsche Bahn (Germany’s national railway service), French carmaker […]

Continue reading

Integrating API Monitoring into Your Product’s Operational Workflow

You’ve got a product that requires many nines of uptime. If an API (external or internal) that your product requires is down, your own product is down, or key aspects of it are down. You are monitoring the APIs that are key for your product, and have alerts configured so that your development and QA […]

Continue reading

Modifying Groups of API Monitors Using Tags

In recent posts, I’ve described how you can use API Science’s API to evaluate API monitor checks, detect failed checks, and use tags to group API monitors. If you’ve integrated the monitoring of your product’s performance and availability using the API Science API, it’s also possible to take the next step of modifying your monitors […]

Continue reading

Why You Should Never Shut Down Your API Servers (unless you absolutely have to)

The ongoing global Ransomeware cyber attack has “hit 200,000 victims in at least 150 countries” according to Europe’s cross-border police agency, Europol: Europol Director Rob Wainwright said the global reach of the attack was “unprecedented” and “pretty indiscriminate,” affecting everything from hospitals and schools to auto giants. “We’ve never seen anything like this,” he told […]

Continue reading

Using Tags to Group API Monitors

Many online products require gathering information from many different data sources. If your product queries multiple APIs (external or internal), then it is vital for your team to monitor those APIs in order to assess whether your product appears up, partially up, or down. My last two posts described how you can use the API […]

Continue reading

Detecting Failed API Monitor Checks Using the API Science API

In my last post, I illustrated how we can use the API Science Checks API endpoint to gather the results of recent checks for an API monitor. In that post, the example check was a successful call for my “br Ireland” monitor, which queries the World Bank Countries API for information about Brazil from a server located in Ireland. My “br_Ireland” monitor has a validation setting that requires an HTTP Response code of “200” in order for the API check to be considered successful…

Continue reading